Black People Don’t Support Black BusinessesEntrepreneurship

Why don’t black people support black businesses? To expand on that why don’t black businesses support other black businesses?

I have noticed this trend. People claim that they will support businesses and will help out and purchase items, but when time comes- they are no where to be found. Black people do a lot of talking and not a lot of doing. This trend of not supporting one another is why many do not succeed. I am not saying hire every black person you meet or purchase from every black person you meet, but why not support those that actually have talent and potential. Or how about mentor someone?

I have always been very observant and I catch everything. It is very interesting and intriguing to watch the dynamics of the black community from dherbs to facebook to twitter to personal life. I have come to the conclusion that majority of the people are all talk, especially on the internet, you can use the internet as a guise to act like you follow a certain path and then turn right back around and not follow through on your words. I am always thinking, planning, theorizing, and I came to the conclusion that somethings are just clear cut; we don’t like ourselves, so we don’t trust ourselves enough to support one another.

I am the type of person if I am ‘competing’ against you, and you ask me a question- I will give you the resources or the answer. I like to compete with the best. I want other people to succeed like me. I am on my path to greatness and whoever is around me, I want them to have the same chance as me. My younger siblings, all are into business and I pass along all the knowledge I have acquired. I tell them what worked for me and what didn’t and I say why. Some have chosen to take all the information and use it, others have chosen to ignore(which is fine). Other people who are like me starting new businesses, if I find a great resource, I send it to them. I dont feel the need to be stingy, because in the end no one can do you, like you. I don’t have competition, because I am my own competition, that is why I willingly help others.

What is sad is when a black person gives advice and it isnt heeded, but that person turns right around and takes the same advice from a non black person. Or when a black person offers a great service, but the potential black customer turns right around and gives it to a person who is non black. The service can be equal, but a large percentage of the time, people will choose the non-black person.

People are not appreciative because they are used to getting things free(the hookup). The hookup is what probably is deterring people from supporting/purchasing in the community. People want to get things for free or heavily discounted. Next time you try to get a hookup, ask yourself “Would I walk into the Apple store and ask for a free iPod” “Would I got to Whole Foods and ask for a free buffet” “Would I go to Macy’s and ask for free clothes”. It seems like people want freebies from new businesses or businesses that don’t have a big name. A name does not always constitute quality. A color does not always constitute quality.

Its just a shame that people I know who have quality services don’t get business. And most of them say “people were always calling me when I was offering my services for free, now that I charge, they are nowhere to be found. Or when they are around they always want for free, discounted, or try to find a way around paying”

I hope one day people change and learn to support and engage. Because with support and engagement, comes confidence. With confidence comes empowerment and finally wiith empowerment comes success.

I rarely use the word the “a” word(All). This post applies to some, however, in this case it might as well be all.

***Lisa-Marie 

A geography PhD student finding peace in creating a balance between the mind, body, soul, & environment.

Facebook  – Instagram – Pinterest – Twitter – YouTube

 

–note:

Hi Everyone,

I wrote this post almost 6 years ago (when I was in a ranting mood) and it is amazing that it is still relevant. In that time, I have gained much knowledge on the topic and even decided to refocus my efforts towards building support and community.

I had an idea that I wanted to launch in a few months, but I think with some many comments/views on this post, that now is better than later. If you are interested in discussing more about this topic and what we, collectively can do to gain support, please send me an email at lisamarie[at]lisamariepierre.com. I hope that my idea is something that will help us work at solving this issue.

I am working on creating more articles on this topic based on research that I am currently learning in school. If you would like to keep up with my work – please subscribe for email updates http://eepurl.com/bFepUT or connect with me via social media @LisaMPierre

Lisa-Marie // 12/17/16

COMMENTS

    • byAneesha
    • onFebruary 5, 2017

    I agree with some of the points on this post…especially the people who are most vocally supportive and wanna buy stuff and know people who would place a ton of orders right up and to the launch of your business and then these same people are no where to be found. But I think it would be remiss not to say that part of it is that black businesses…especially new black businesses…face some of the same issues that all small and new businesses face. For one they are unable to compete price wise with long standing conpetitors and the big corporations. Yeah I know with smaller businesses they promising quality and a more personalized shopping experience. But at the end of the day, why would I buy a hoodie for $60 when the spot down the street sells the same one for $25?? I’m not refusing to by because it’s a BOB and I don’t trust them or want to support…but I have bills to pay and a family to feed. No one is gonna spend full price on a product they could get for half that at another place. I’m not saying under sell yourself or that I go into BOB tryna get a hook up or a deal and talk them down in price…but if I go into a store a see an expensive item I can get elsewhere for cheaper I’m gonna by it elsewhere. That’s not a concept that’s exclusive to black people….everyone wants a sale and does comparison shopping and I think it’s unfair to put that aspect of people’s issues with BOB’s on black people….why are blacks held to a different standard than everyone else when it comes to shopping and money?? I support BOB when I can but really these same BOB are not putting food on my table or a roof over my head. Don’t get me wrong there’s always going to be people that are negative and obnoxious and want something for nothing….but at the same time having an attitude that the black community owes you something just because you opened a business isn’t right either. Also everyone likes to call themselves an entrepreneur these days especially young blacks and I’ve supported people who was doing business and taking orders out they house…everyone has to start somewhere. But I find a lot of these young self proclaimed entrepreneurs don’t know how to conduct business. Like they play too much…they want money up front then don’t know how to reply to messages or phone calls when you’re checking in to inquire about your orders. Very unprofessional and these young black entrepreneurs don’t learn until they little dreams down the drain.

    Again as you said in your article (which I enjoyed) this applies to SOME not ALL….I just think it’s unfair not to consider both sides of the table.

      • bypat.
      • onApril 6, 2017

      Agree. Except ine point. When there is a biz owner giving their best to serve the customer. We as a community and individual owe it to them to support their business

        • byPrecious
        • onApril 7, 2017

        Right!

  1. My name is; Lamar Nix Sr.,
    I am CEO and Owner of: POS PEOPLES MERCHANT SERVICES LLC dba CoCard Los Angeles

    We provide credit card processing services throughout the USA and Canada at Discount Rates.

    We provide the same merchant services products as many of the big national banks such as B of A, Wells Fargo, Citi, and other providers. And in most cases we are able to offer more products to may merchants accross the USA but, Guess What?.. We call on black businesses to support us and about 98% of them that we contact and many whom know that we are out here don’t give us there business, they just keep going to the big banks and the others.

    Even though we use the very same systems and services that most of the big banks are using and In most case we are giving those very same services and products at half 1/2 of the cost every month.

    We’ve been pre-programmed to not trust our own people “Black Owned Businesses” doing business and offering products and services and at many times giving you products and services at 1/2 the prices but, guess what?

    Most Black Businesses will Still Not Give You There Business.

    Here’s our Challenge to Black Business Owners: If we cannot beat your current bank credit card processing Rates; We Will give you $500.00

    This Challenge isn’t new, we’ve always offered this to every business in the USA.

    Fax a copy of a current merchant processing statement to the contact information listed below.

    We appreciate our supporters and current and future merchant.

    Lamar Nix Sr., CEO
    CORPORATE OFFICES:
    POS PEOPLES MERCHANT SERVICES LLC dba CoCard
    309 E. Hillcrest Blvd. Suite 539
    Inglewood, CA. 90301

    Website: http://www.cocardpos.com
    National: (888) 576-0665 Ext. 1
    Fax: (866) 467-3209
    Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/POSSystemsales

  2. Hi Everyone,

    I wrote this post almost 6 years ago and it is amazing that it is still relevant. In that time, I have gained much knowledge on the topic and even decided to refocus my efforts towards building support and community.

    I had an idea that I wanted to launch in a few months, but I think with some many comments on this post, that now is better than later. If you are interested in discussing more about this topic and what we, collectively can do to gain support, please send me an email at lisamarie[at]lisamariepierre.com. I hope that my idea is something that will help us work at solving this issue.

    I am working on creating more articles on this topic based on research that I am currently learning in school. If you would like to keep up with my work – please subscribe for email updates http://eepurl.com/bFepUT or connect with me via social media @LisaMPierre

    Lisa-Marie

  3. Just started a black beauty supply store and see that we do get support from the black community as well as other communities. However, we already discount our prices at the store to be more competitive and some people still want an even bigger discount so I can relate to what you are saying in your post.

      • bypat.
      • onDecember 15, 2016

      Black people are still mental slaves of the european system that is designed to keep you in a subservient and inferior position.

      • byLisa-Marie Pierre
      • onDecember 16, 2016

      Hi “Beauty Supply Denver”, I wrote this post almost 6 years ago and it is amazing that it is still relevant. In that time, I have gained much knowledge on the topic and even decided to refocus some of my efforts towards building support and community. I had an idea that I wanted to launch in a few months, but I think with some many comments on this post, that now is better than later. If you are interested in discussing more about this topic and what we, collectively can do to gain support, please send me an email at lisamarie[at]lisamariepierre.com. I hope that my idea is something that will help us work at solving this issue. I am going to write this message to all that expressed concern and hopefully we can move on from there.

      Lisa-Marie

      • byLachelle
      • onFebruary 26, 2017

      I thought I was shocked at the lack of support from African Americans. The Caucasion community is reaching out. In the process of offering more Caucasion products.

    • byDana A
    • onDecember 14, 2016

    I searched for this topic particularly and this blog came up and explains a lot. I too, just launched a business based off overwhelming feedback that I should pursue. I took a few months to build up the brand, sent out teasers, social media blasts, I got all the YAY we so proud of you, can’t wait to see, I got you feedback, but when I launched, it was just more of the same thing. I got 142 views to my page in one day and 8 orders, and those were from my aunties! Friends who said they would order, have not. It is still early, but I am already seeing some of the things you wrote here. Now on the flip, when friends have sold t-shirts, events, GoFundMes, I was the first to contribute, now those people are ghosts…or act like they don’t see…what I call Selective Facebook Vision. The point you make about we don’t like ourselves, so we don’t trust ourselves is hard to swallow, but a lot of truth to it. I have left my page “colorless” hoping I will attract the masses You are also right on the talk, they can say they are going to support on a social media platform to play the role, but no one never knows they didn’t but you. I had one asked for something specific, I went out and bought the materials needed, made them, then the person started acting flaky, now don’t even hear from them. Another part is our financial picture. A lot of us want to act like we got it and don’t. My items are from 10-30 dollars and I offered a first time 25% off discount and still those people who were talking in the beginning have not purchased. Or wait until its sold and I say. awww man I wanted that one. Girl Bye. Thank you for this insight, I don’t know if it is all, but it is a lot!

      • bypat.
      • onDecember 15, 2016

      Please sent me your website link. And perhaps you will in exchange become my preferred customer while sharing my infovwith others. Lets try. I will email my site if you do not see it here. Lets start a movement.

    • Hi Dana, I wrote this post almost 6 years ago and it is amazing that it is still relevant. In that time, I have gained much knowledge on the topic and even decided to refocus some of my efforts towards building support and community. I had an idea that I wanted to launch in a few months, but I think with some many comments on this post, that now is better than later. If you are interested in discussing more about this topic and what we, collectively can do to gain support, please send me an email at lisamarie[at]lisamariepierre.com. I hope that my idea is something that will help us work at solving this issue. I am going to write this message to all that expressed concern and hopefully we can move on from there.

      Lisa-Marie

    • byPat B
    • onDecember 13, 2016

    FOR THE MOST PART, it seems the best way to do business and get support from both Black and other races is to hide who you are.

  4. Pingback: Why Don't Black People Support Black Businesses - EbonyDirectory.com

    • byAziza
    • onOctober 20, 2016

    Yeah everything in this article is so true. I own a black business ( I sell hair and beauty products). Though these products are geared towards black people, they don’t seem to want to support. The sad thing is that the other store we are competing with is not even black owned! There is so much we had planned to start doing to expand the business and really help our community but we don’t have enough funds because we aren’t generating enough money to start these things. The other company is big (and has several different locations) so in order to compete with them we have had sales and even matched some of our prices but it is as though the people have resolved never to come back here again. Some of the same stuff we sell is even a little cheaper yet people go there anyway. And though some of the hair can be expensive here (and we have more affordable alternatives), the quality is great and those get it have it for an average of 1 year. Honestly, it saddens me because when I see Jewish and Chinese races for example owning their own business, you will see they support one another because it is for the betterment off the community, regardless of the price. I wish we as black people would think the same way. Regardless, I thank God for our loyal customers. It may take time but one day we will support one another and reap the benefits. Amen.

      • byManny1
      • onDecember 4, 2016

      I am a Real Estate Investor in South Florida. I buy dilapidated and abandoned property, do a modern rehab and get it back on the market quickly. My workmanship is impeccable compared to other investors in my market. They all tell me do not put so much into it. In other words, be a slum lord. My name is associated with every deal I do. I pay cash and settle all liens and debts against the property aside from the contract price to sellers. More often than not, black owners shew me away. Most times they contact another investor from a bandit sign. Those are the signs hung all over “the hood” from fences and light poles. Those bandits sign posters often wholesale to other investors with a mark-up for themselves. One family actually had a wholesaler write up a contract for me to sign adding 20 percent to my offer as his compensation. He had convinced them I was not paying enough for the property so he added 20 percent then charged them 20 percent. I knew the guy was a shamster and called him out in front of them, then walked away from that deal. He got them to close with another buyer for less money. I am a minority in the real estate business. The areas I try to focus my buying efforts in are predominantly Black/African American. I marketed these areas with a call back rate of less than 2 percent. I got a Hispanic looking friend of mine to market for me and the response rate was waaaay higher. His phone hasn’t stopped ringing. He sets appointments and get purchase contracts signed. We have presented identical contracts to sellers hours apart. His was accepted and signed. Mine had to be thought over. My mentor once told me to accept the fact that my ice ain’t cold enough to be in this business. If I was booboo the bootleg CD and movie salesman they would have my number on speed dial under Hook Up.

        • bypat.
        • onDecember 15, 2016

        Wow! Classic example of what i said previously. I met a Black man who owned a travel agency but concealed his identity by.hiring white employees. It was successful. It is sad that even our own people will purchase the same packages offers from a white owned company over a Black owned company of the same or higher quality

        • byAziza
        • onDecember 16, 2016

        Wow really?? But seriously how are we then going to get jobs into our communities if we cannot hire our own … I’m just confused. Black people we need to stop this.

          • bypat.
          • onDecember 16, 2016

          Hi. Can all of you ownerd and non owners agree to team up with us by changi g a little thi g like your soap? My solution to the problem is simple. Who among the talkers snd complainer will dare take the first step? wealthbook2010@gmail.com

          • Hi Pat, I wrote this post almost 6 years ago and it is amazing that it is still relevant. In that time, I have gained much knowledge on the topic and even decided to refocus some of my efforts towards building support and community. I had an idea that I wanted to launch in a few months, but I think with some many comments on this post, that now is better than later. If you are interested in discussing more about this topic and what we, collectively can do to gain support, please send me an email at lisamarie[at]lisamariepierre.com. I hope that my idea is something that will help us work at solving this issue. I am going to write this message to all that expressed concern and hopefully we can move on from there.

            Also, I see you are from Long Island, so am I. Perhaps we can meet up for tea/coffee and chat more when I am in town.

            Lisa-Marie

        • Hi Aziza, I wrote this post almost 6 years ago and it is amazing that it is still relevant. In that time, I have gained much knowledge on the topic and even decided to refocus some of my efforts towards building support and community. I had an idea that I wanted to launch in a few months, but I think with some many comments on this post, that now is better than later. If you are interested in discussing more about this topic and what we, collectively can do to gain support, please send me an email at lisamarie[at]lisamariepierre.com. I hope that my idea is something that will help us work at solving this issue. I am going to write this message to all that expressed concern and hopefully we can move on from there.

          Lisa-Marie

      • Hi “Beauty Supply Denver”, I wrote this post almost 6 years ago and it is amazing that it is still relevant. In that time, I have gained much knowledge on the topic and even decided to refocus some of my efforts towards building support and community. I had an idea that I wanted to launch in a few months, but I think with some many comments on this post, that now is better than later. If you are interested in discussing more about this topic and what we, collectively can do to gain support, please send me an email at lisamarie[at]lisamariepierre.com. I hope that my idea is something that will help us work at solving this issue. I am going to write this message to all that expressed concern and hopefully we can move on from there.

        Also, I am going to be in Florida for the next 10 days, maybe we can link up for tea/coffee to discuss this more.

        Lisa-Marie

      • byLachelle
      • onFebruary 26, 2017

      Im in the process of switching products geared to the Caucasion community before I go out of business. Caucasion community is reaching out. I have lowered prices but it is still complaints, nothing is ever good enough they still go to Asian store 30 miles away.Then complain they didn’t have a store in the community.

        • bypat.
        • onMarch 23, 2017

        What is your business? A grocery store?

  5. A majority of black businesses do not fully support its black customers.

      • Hi Harkhuf, I wrote this post almost 6 years ago and it is amazing that it is still relevant. In that time, I have gained much knowledge on the topic and even decided to refocus some of my efforts towards building support and community. I had an idea that I wanted to launch in a few months, but I think with some many comments on this post, that now is better than later. If you are interested in discussing more about this topic and what we, collectively can do to gain support, please send me an email at lisamarie[at]lisamariepierre.com. I hope that my idea is something that will help us work at solving this issue. I am going to write this message to all that expressed concern and hopefully we can move on from there.

        Lisa-Marie

      • byErika
      • onSeptember 24, 2016

      So i guess Ralph Lauren and Popeyes do.

    • byalec
    • onJuly 27, 2016

    Very simple: “crabs in a bucket”

      • bypat.
      • onDecember 15, 2016

      This is a true statement. And those who try to escape are held back by grabbing the foot of those crawling out of the basket. That is the life of the well European trained. African in america. Worse this disease has infected our people globally. The solution is..those of us who are aware. What are we doung to implement a change?

    • byJames
    • onJune 6, 2016

    My Experience has been that Black Business feel they do not need to show you the same respect as they would give to other races. it is very hard to support someone who do not feel you deserve the same amount of respect as everyone else. this is why most black business do not succeed we have never learned to respect or support each other. we prefer to hate on each other and thinks we are getting ahead there is no one holding down the Black Business but themselves how sad.

  6. Thank you Marie.

    I feel as if you are only telling one side of the story.

    For starters, let’s highlight the realities and perhaps from there, we can have a much firmer understanding of this dynamic as opposed to once again playing the role of the victim. By doing so, we not only become the beneficiary of double standard but also are self inducing racial regression.

    Let’s start with the surface question of why should we support black bussiness? In one breath we ask for equality and to be judged on our merits and not color. Then in the next blink of the eye, we once again and conveniently play the color card, but this time against each other.

    But again, like I said, it is a surface question that can repeatedly be asked on deeper levels.

    Many black businesses are in low income and high crime areas, not to mention are not in aesthetically pleasing locations with equally drab storefronts and interiors. So are we to return to the areas that we endeavored to leave because of its shortcomings, all while neglecting consumer behavior patterns because we are black? That’s brilliant!

    Now let’s examine the convenience aspect. How many black bussiness do no accept credit cards or checks and have an equally as wonky return policy? Yeah that’s attractive.

    Digging deeper, many times there is added cost to goods because of greed as well as an attempted measure to compensate for low sales volume.

    Next is staffing, I don’t think I really need to expand on the prevalence of uninterested, unreliable and inept employees.

    So a better question is why should we?

    • From an earlier post:

      What i’ve learned today is that no matter what happens i still have to support black businesses because of simple maths and common sense.

      If we invest more financially in ourselves AND keep re-investing in our selves AND teach future generations to do the same, we will be better posititioned financially to give ourselves:

      better education
      better health care
      better living standards
      better quality of life
      ….and any thing else i’ve missed out that makes life better for black people.

      Simple.

        • byPrecious
        • onJune 1, 2016

        Thank you Harkhuf! You are 100% correct! I wish all people thought the same way.

      • byPrecious
      • onJune 1, 2016

      What advise do you have for my business? I am located in a nice area, we take Credit Cards, crime is rare in the area, excellent customer service skills, authentic delicious food is served, clean environment, maintains a health score of A, reasonable prices, mid to high income area…So why black people give me a hard time AND don’t support my business? I’ve tried to think of so many reasons, but nothing makes sense to not support. The only thing i can think of, is that they are Haters. Simple as that.Black people are offended when they see another black person doing good, providing great service and trying to reach success. As black people we complain about not having black businesses, but when one come, you don’t support…really?…who does that?… Makes no logical sense.

      • Hi Precious, I wrote this post almost 6 years ago and it is amazing that it is still relevant. In that time, I have gained much knowledge on the topic and even decided to refocus some of my efforts towards building support and community. I had an idea that I wanted to launch in a few months, but I think with some many comments on this post, that now is better than later. If you are interested in discussing more about this topic and what we, collectively can do to gain support, please send me an email at lisamarie[at]lisamariepierre.com. I hope that my idea is something that will help us work at solving this issue. I am going to write this message to all that expressed concern and hopefully we can move on from there.

        I was so sad to hear you moved from Conyers. I was in the area in November and wanted to visit your restaurant! I will have to wait until I go to New Orleans.

        Lisa-Marie

        • bypat.
        • onMarch 23, 2017

        Try
        Food delivery to local business. Ig the Chinese can do thid do csn you. Let me know how it works out. Also. My family member open a restautant in a 80percent white area. My advice to him…Don’t say your the ownet. You just work therr ad the manager. And the restaurant is doing well.

      • byDan
      • onJuly 12, 2016

      You should, like Dr. John Henrik Clarke said, “We have no friends.” We as a people are totally dependant on someone else to live. We basically cannot do for ourselves. Do you really want that for your children and future generations? This is what we must understand.

    • byShawn
    • onMay 19, 2016

    I agree with your post. I started a web design business and I’m close to shutting it down. 98% of my business is in the black community and there has been a serious lack of business etiquette with most clients I meet. The biggest obstacles I get are from so-called business professionals that want me to “prove myself” to them to do business. That involves time and expense on my part that is not worth it when I have a portfolio and a list of work for people to reference. It’s also crazy to me that my own “friends” suggest everything from working at fast food to warehouse jobs constantly even after showing them I have a business. Why when we get into the tech industry or in any creative fields, do we get this animosity from our own community?

      • bypat.
      • onMarch 23, 2017

      Easy. They want you to r
      Remain in the crab basket

  7. Hi
    i’ve recently started a black business directory http://ebonydirectory.com
    The simple reason is that after hearing people talk, watching videos, visiting seminars, listening to talk shows and surfing the Internet i realised that we could support each other as black businesses, if we truly wanted to.

    i’ve been involved in IT for over 20 years and am good at what i do.
    When i work as a contractor in offices, i am often asked if i would like to extend the contract as i’m doing a good job.

    Recently i decided to not accept a contract / job offer extension as i wanted to literally ‘mind my own business !’ After alot of thought regarding how best to utilise my skills to bring betterment to my immediate black community and the black community as a whole, i decided to create a website to bring together black businesses, locally, nationally and globally where people who want to support black businesses could find them more easily. http://ebonydirectory.com is just that.

    I started to write an article today on ‘why don’t black people support black businesses?’ and to make sure the article is relevant i have been doing some research. That is how i found this article and these posts. All of which are good, and Lisa this post is great and very informative.

    I live in the UK (which really should be the UQ lol) where there are alot of black people and alot of black businesses.
    Supporting black businesses is easy. Whenever you want to spend money on something, just think of your local black business that supplies what you want and if there isn’t one, ask someone you know or look on the Internet. If you can’t find one and it is something that you are knowledgeable about and passionate about it, start a business yourself (providing there is enough demand and you are determined to succeed).

    Today I had a pre-arranged appointment with a black business owner.
    Upon arrival he asked me what i was offering and i told him ‘i have recently started a directory for black businesses and a mutual friend said that you’d be interested’.
    ‘Where is your iPad?’, he said.
    ‘I don’t have one’, i said. The fact that things are a little difficult at the moment was not something that i wanted to explain to him in front of his staff and the white customer that was in his shop.
    ‘How many customers do you have already?’, he said.
    ‘Not many right now as it’s a new business’, i responded.
    ‘Oh i thought you were already established. Any way i’m busy right now so give me a free trial and i’ll see if i’m interested’.
    ‘It’s not free’, i replied.
    ‘Well how am i going to know if i want it or not? I’m sure i’ve seen you before’, he said.
    I accepted the menu that he gave me for me to get the details of his business and post it onto my website so he can review it for two weeks to see if he is interested.

    He had seen me before.
    I have been in his shop a few times before and have asked for my order and paid each time.
    Without asking for a FREE SAMPLE !!
    Not even the first time LOL

    I think while i was there he spent 10-15 seconds looking at the website that has taken me a great deal of time, effort and research to build.

    The price i wanted to ask him to advertise on the website was very very reasonable simply because it is a new site and i know people will be somewhat wary.

    For the sum of £20 / $29.16 i have to find his company’s website (which is no longer online, so i have to find the images elsewhere or scan the menu), download and resize the images, create text saying what a lovely business it is, put the menu up along with opening and closing times, SEO (search engine optimise) the webpage, submit it to google, check the facebook page has updated correctly with his new entry, check the twitter page has updated with his new entry and then wait 2 weeks to see if he wants to pay me or not??!! LOL

    Yes these are challenges that any new business will face.

    However, as black business owners we should give each other a chance, and take an interest in other black businesses regardless of what stage they are at. If we think a business could be a good idea to invest in, we could take more with the business owner so we can at least get to know the person who owns or operates the business.

    As has been mentioned in this post before we will give each other a hard time before spending any money with each other, then with any business owned by another race we probably approach them, say or choose what we want, pay, say thanks and then leave.

    It was a disappointing experience and i won’t pretend that it wasn’t, however, i will still continue to support black businesses and i’ll probably even go back into his shop and support him.

    What i’ve learned today is that no matter what happens i still have to support black businesses because of simple maths and common sense.

    If we invest more financially in ourselves AND keep re-investing in our selves AND teach future generations to do the same, we will be better posititioned financially to give ourselves:

    better education
    better health care
    better living standards
    better quality of life
    ….and any thing else i’ve missed out that makes life better for black people.

    Simple.

  8. I totally agree on this. I have a few businesses and unfortunately yet fortunately, most of my clients are Government Depts and white people from all over the world. I only have two private enterprise clients who are black. I’ve just started my own mobile gaming company as well and getting support from my own friends to even visit the Facebook page seems impossible furthermore checking the game titles. What is odd, is that I’ve been gaining interests from top execs in the gaming industry in relation to a published game and what I have coming soon; I don’t have to say these people are white either. Thing is that my country is 95% Black. It is really depressing to see where we have come as a people. We’re free from the chains that kept us close, this freedom from the chains seems to push us further apart.

      • byRebecca Saterfield
      • onApril 25, 2016

      You are so right Lisa Marie. I’m in a business for myself and I call everyone I know who happens to be black and they are so unsupportive it’s a shame, in fact they don’t even believe in my dreams. White people, Asians, Hispanics; they all support each other and I bet you they’ll support me too. Why can’t Black people? Because they are all selfish.

        • byPat B
        • onDecember 13, 2016

        Its exactly what I have experienced Rebecca. Its a sickness.

    • byFelicia
    • onMarch 16, 2016

    I was so angry, I forgot to even mention the Black Nail Tech. I stopped going to her. No other income, but only wanted to work a few days a week and 1/2 days….yet ALWAYS complaining about bills and struggling for $. Ummm…common sense dont tell you working more hours would help?!?! Stop wanting lay around in the bed all the time being lazy. Come to the salon you pay rent for you may get some walk-ins and develop more regular customers? Everytime you turn around it was a “please donate” jar for one of countless events for her daughter. Then at my next appt she selling stuff for her daughters school. She slipped up one day that she makes a good profit of that $ for herself to keep when selling calendars, candles, xmas cards “for the school.” I see why she was so aggressive ALWAYS selling something. Then her phone is cut off. I felt like my $5 tip to her for a fill-in just wasnt enough. There were times last yr I even tipped her $20. A customer doesnt mind contributing to good causes. But dang, everytime you turn around if it wasnt pls donate, then she selling pocketbooks and scarves. Then get an attitude if you didnt like the pocketbooks. And it was not my style and overpriced. I go to NY shopping where Im from if I need more fly stuff. I get very nice stuff there. Then its a fish fry she wants you to go to. She’s trying to raise $. Im not driving 15 miles one way for a fish fry, I cook that at home. Home for me is 2 miles from the nail salon. I even told her at my LAST APPT (in a semi nice way) “thats why alot of people don’t like doing business with our kind.” Too much attitude. It was ridiculous. I now think back like “was I going to a nail salon or a crisis assistance ministry?” Point being I dont experience that at the white salons. Again, I CANT DO BUSINESS WITH BLACK PEOPLE!!!!

    • byFelicia
    • onMarch 15, 2016

    Before I get started I will let you know that I am Black. And, I will stand by my DONT DO BUSINESS WITH BLACK PEOPLE UNTIL THE DAY I DIE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! My best friend who is also Black…strongly agrees. I will give you the first situation. I was living in NY in the year 2000. I purchased a car and needed to insure it. So my best friend and I started talking about Mr. (Blank) who owned an Allstate office. I thought let me support our people. I called his office on a weekday during business hours. The first attempt……riiinnng…..riiinnnggg….riiiinnnng. No v-mail avail. Waited a while called back. No answer. Tried again….NO ANSWER. The next day, same thing ALL DAY LONG. Went down to the office during business hours. Lights off, no sign on the door…no nothing. I thought forget it, who operates a “business” like that!?!? So I call a white company. Answered phone on first ring. Happy to help got quotes and the whole nine. Im comparison shopping. So, called two more places. Got a person RIGHT AWAY with quotes. I made a decision and had my car insurance same day. So we happened to run into Mr (Blank) about a week later. I said “I was trying to get in contact w/ you for a couple days for insurance but couldnt leave a msg or anything.” His response was “oh Im not always there, I be in and out.” l thought uugh uugh uugh… “black people!” Now in 2016 Im in North Carolina. I bought a car 11/20/2015. I REALLY needed a car and found one. The guy was nice. He said he and his father are fr Bklyn and they sell cars. I thought let me support a Brotha. He told me he had just bought the car same day fr auction. He’ll do bill of sale and give me all paperwork, to carry with me. He’s seen Titles that sometimes can take UP TO 90 days before it gets TO HIM. Hmmm….I’ve been buying used cars for over 25 yrs, but o.k. He said he’d contact me soon as he gets it. I had insurance on it, but Sixty days go buy. Im worried that I can get a ticket any day, but I’m patient. On 91st day I contact him. He says “oh, I had the Title since a week after you bought the car, I was trying to figure out who’s it was…..I was waiting for YOU TO contact ME.” I said but you had my number, and all of our texting each other etc, AND you made copies of originals you gave me in large brown envelope.” He says “I couldnt find your number.” But my number is on the paperwork you provide me.” I finally get him to agree to mail the Title. I provided my address AGAIN lol. Last week I had a hit and run. Great…I have unregistered car and license plate belongs to my old car 🙁 I contact him that day. He says check your mail. No Title. Today 3/15/16 I follow up AGAIN. He says I’ll give you tracking number. Nice to know I have a tracking number….he COULD’VE told me that! I track it and it was sent certified mail on 3/6/2016….note left…no authorized signature! Great! Had he let me know he was sending signature required mail, I wouldve looked for it. From past experience mailmen always claim “note left” but DO NOT always. Only I have key to my mailbox. Point being….follow up with your customers!!! Its simple to shoot a text “I mailed it certified….here is your tracking #…that is what professionals do!!! DONT DO BUSINESS WITH BLACK PEOPLE!!!! Had it been a white business they would’ve at least kept me informed on status or SOMETHING!!! And Black people wonder why we take our money elsewhere. Yep…even if it means I’d pay more. I haven’t experience this crap no where else. DONT DO BUSINESS WITH BLACK PEOPLE!!!!! I cant even say I’d give it one more chance to prove me wrong!! No apologies. The truth is the truth!!!!

      • byPrecious
      • onMarch 18, 2016

      I own a black business. My husband and I work 75-80 hours a week. We are at our business EVERYDAY. We open 11am and close at 7pm. We get to work EVERYDAY at 7:30am to prep and leave AFTER 7pm. Our business is clean as a whistle, we are super friendly ( even to the rudest people) , beautiful decor, people are so amazed at our wonderful customer service because they assume black people are always unprofessional.(Our customers even told us a few horror stories about other black businesses). As a black person myself, I have experienced awful service too, but I also experienced it from white and Chinese people as well. It’s a bad thing that so many black businesses treated you this way, but not all are like that. Trust me. I have so many stories I can chat with you regarding our people. I know it’s a lil off topic, but since being in business, I have to deal with the public 24/7, and I use to hear people talking all the time about black women have attitudes and are so bitter and angry. I really didn’t understand it and I felt a certain type of way about that stereotype. But, In 2015 I opened my business and started experiencing SEVERE hatred, jealousy, anger, bitterness from my black people (sisters only). I was so confused and disappointed how true this stereotype was. (Of course not all sisters) the white men and women, even the black men give us no problem. They order, don’t complain, don’t question you, don’t have an attitude for no reason, etc. but these sisters….OFF THE CHAIN…this is a shame. As a race, we gotta do better and stop all this hating on each other. Other races embrace each other when they make it or become successful. Our people…. Try to tear you down…make up lies about people. Whyyyy??? I wish I had an answer… But back to topic…I hope one day you run into a great black business ( like mines)…I know there are other great black businesses as well, but don’t give up. I want to write more, but I gotta get back to work. Ttyl.

    • Hi Felicia
      It’s sad to hear of your previous experiences.
      I’m also aware that you’d highly probably never do business with black people again.
      This makes me wonder if people consider the fact that if we do not ever do business with black people (ourselves) we will never learn to trust each other or rely on each other.
      Do you also teach other black people to do the same thing?
      Do you also teach younger generations the same thing?

      What future could we possibly have as a race if we encourage each other and future generations of black children to never spend money with each other?

      I cannot understand that.

      I too have had plenty of experiences with losing money with black people, poor service quality, service providers not arriving on time or not at all.
      However I’ve also had those experiences with other races too !

      It just makes sense to me to invest as much as possible in my own kind because if we don’t, who will?

      If no one invests in black businesses you can be guaranteed in a few years all of our future generations will have to depend on employment from other races which means that other races will be in control of our race?

      Have we forgotten the unpleasantness of when that last happened?

    • byPhilani
    • onMarch 2, 2016

    Thank you for this post, lol it just reminded me of so many promises made by my black brothers when I started my own business but like you said “People claim that they will support businesses and will help out and purchase items, but when time comes- they are no where to be found.”

      • byPrecious
      • onMarch 18, 2016

      You are so right. Even family and wanna be friends will leave you hanging.

    • byrick
    • onJanuary 21, 2016

    do you think white people go out and look for white businesses to support? Not likely. This concept is racist.
    support businesses because they are good. have a good business and people will come.

    • Hi Rick.

      This concept is not racist. In fact studies show that businesses that receive support from their communities succeed. This type of support is needed because often in the past these groups were not support by due to segregation, zoning laws, etc. Because of this they had to rely on their own groups for supports. White people don’t necessarily have to think of this because they are in the majority.

      When thinking of this concept – think of when Irish, Jewish, Chinese, etc have businesses and garner support from other business owners by the same ethnicity or customers from the same ethnicity.

      If you want to learn more about this topic go to Google Scholar and check out articles on ethnic enclaves. Look up articles about ethnic entrepreneurs and business performance – https://scholar.google.com/

    • There was a time approximately 50 ago when black people arrived here in the UK in large numbers.

      They needed places to live but were often greeted with signs in the windows of guest houses stating:

      No Blacks
      No Irish
      No Dogs

      https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=no+irish+no+dogs+no+blacks&prmd=isvn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjDtN2WlpPNAhXnIMAKHZCzDCIQ_AUIBygB&biw=414&bih=628

      If a black person set up a guest house welcoming black people in those days that would have been considered racist too.

      However from a humanitarian point of view, business point of view and from a point of view of becoming financially independent as a race it makes good sense.

      Supporting black businesses means we create our own economic independence and can let go of the many stigmas and problems that come with not supporting our own.

      How is that racist?

      Also here in the UK there are several white owned businesses that will only employ people from a particular part of Europe. Many of these people are self employed or have their own limited company.

      As a business when employing someone in that manner means you enter into a business contract, so yes :

      “White people do go out and look for white businesses to support”

    • byr.val
    • onAugust 6, 2015

    So sad and yet so true. Our ppl for the most part is just flat out ignorant. I’m sry but I gotta say I like that. You hit it dead on. I’m a SBO I’m in the auto painting industry. I recently gave a guy a blk guy an estimate. I’m in a position where as I can save him his deductible which was $500. I also was gonna (get this) give him $400.00 back out of the Ins check and use quality material on his car as I use on every job I do because I don’t believe in using cheap material. Do u thk he called me back. NOT!!!! I guess the deal breaker was when I told’im he’d have to pay for his car rental (which I set up) and…..got a discount on the rental car. He didn’t have rental coverage on his Ins . policy. That’s the kinda shit we (black) small business owners have to go thur with our ppl. Just out right dumb N—-s.

      • byPrecious
      • onAugust 6, 2015

      Wow. The stuff we have to go thru is ridiculous. Being a SBO is a challenge as it is, but when our own black people hate on us and act a donkey, makes it more challenging. My husband and I is just keeping the Faith, because in the end we Win! God has us covered. Just don’t give up! Stay encouraged! Trust in God!

        • byErika
        • onJune 11, 2016

        We have the same problem in New Orleans our people love to support the Arabs. They will down talk a black person business or copy your business.

    • byPrecious
    • onJuly 16, 2015

    Tony in feel you 100%. 5 months ago my husband and I opened our first small cajun restaurant. We provide excellent customer service, authentic cuisines, we greet and smile with every customer that walks thru the door and our prices are affordable. Our white customers never complain about prices, they are repeat customers and they spread the word. But black people (particularly black women mostly) give us a hard time, seems like on a daily basis. Black customers that come in our restaurant says our prices are “breaking their pockets”, they question where we get our products, they questioning how long we been in business, where are we from. The classic is, “uhm, I’m on a diet so I really don’t want anything” . Oh here’s another, “my mom or my sister cook the same thing too” or “I’m allergic to seafood ” but you walked into a seafood restaurant which displays seafood on the outside window (words and pics). So so many excuses not to purchase from us. I can go on and on with my experiences, but it’s too much to type. I’m just so surprised that our own black community don’t support us. I gave out hundreds of flyers to black people in town claiming they will come because they support black businesses and we never see them walk thru the door. Next door from us is a white company who owns a print shop and 95% of his customer base is black. 2% of his black customers walked over to buy from us. The rest would just drive off when their done. I’m glad I found this blog. We thought we was dealing with this alone and I see now after researching that this is very very common. It’s a shame and I also feel our leaders need to say something about this because black businesses need support. I know God has us covered. We just have to hold on.

    • Thank you Precious for sharing your experiences. Do you mind sharing where your business is located? I would love to spread the word about your cajun restaurant! I often profile women business owners on my website.

        • Hi Precious! I am just seeing your message. How unfortunate, because I was just in Lithonia, GA a week ago. Next time I am in Atlanta, I will come stop by your restaurant. Thank you for sharing your website with me.

    • bydee
    • onJune 27, 2015

    I have tried to support multiple black businesses but the outcome wasn’t so great…. Making it look bad for black business owners. Integrity goes a long way. If you don’t have your work you don’t have nothing.

    • bytony
    • onMay 24, 2015

    when i was a kid i found black business to be archaic,poor lighting,wood planks for floors and blacks that don’t know their products and non caring black employees..

    • byMr Watson
    • onMarch 16, 2015

    The worse people to trust are the big mouths the black civil rights. They talk black but their hearts is not for their people they are fakes Buying black day was a fail as black hates blacks when we admit to this only then will we move foward

      • byJames
      • onJune 6, 2016

      Not much has change.

    • byMandy
    • onJanuary 7, 2015

    Thanks for this post. Not only will black business lack support from their community but is goes deeper than that! Sometimes your won family will rally against you to make you fail. I have run a business for 12 years and rather than support me my black family, siblings and one parent have over the years done everything than can to disrupt and destroy my business due to petty jealousy envy and shear wickedness. I am a Christian so I forgive but I cannot forgive. I have observed other communities. And they just don’t have this toxic problem. This attitude we have is the number one reason black business have a tough time succeeding. WE DO NOT SUPPORT ONE ANOTHER. Without goodwill and support of a your nearest and dearest plus the support of your community NO BUSINESS can succeed. Success is borne out of support whether it is moral or financial or just plain custom. No custom no business. And if the business owner has no positive support from family members — its hard to succeed because your morale is dented. All those who run a business know how hard it is to start and keep it going. The basic truth that if you don’t support black people running businesses less will be successful and less will exist just doesn’t register. Its so sad that in the UK and the USA and black community just can’t support those of us brave enough to set up businesses and trade in a hostile hostile business environment.

      • bypat.
      • onMarch 24, 2017

      Truth be told. Amen

    • byStephanie McClain
    • onOctober 9, 2014

    I agree this blog is great, I support so many black businesses in the area, and when I speak about what I have to offer, I am often ignored/look at funny in the community. I go to many small restaurants in my area, and not only the owners are rude, but I think sometimes they don’t even realize they are rude. I always feel like it’s tit for tat in the black business arena or it’s the hookup. I’ve been always looked at funny in my community when it comes to leaving my business cards, flyers, in a black business establishment in my area. But it is what it is.

      • bypat.
      • onMarch 24, 2017

      Hi Stephanie…what business are you in.?

    • well if you off good goods and services you should be supported regardless of race black people some assume that coz you are black that all black people should support you we are not joined at the hip

  9. Pingback: 2012: My blog, a year in review

    • bytony
    • onAugust 30, 2012

    i totally agree with what u have said; i live in a small town and i own a pizza shop and im the only pizza buisness in town, now been in buisness for almost 3 years 95% of my customers are white i will never understand blacks and i will never try! and on top of that there was a black person that came into my business and said that” a black man owns a pizza shop shouldnt be” which is crazy cuz u can do anything your want to do and put your mind too, it doesnt matter! but black people will be black people! my question is “why this topic is not being discuss or publicize more often by our black leaders of america!

      • byadmin
      • onSeptember 4, 2012

      Congrats Tony on making it to year 3 of owning a business! It is unfortunate you had that experience in your pizza shop. From those type of situations, there is always a learning experience. The 5% of customers that are non-whites visit your establishment for a reason; find out why and then use that data to work on a marketing strategy that would bring in more minority customers. Perhaps join the Chamber of Commerce or business associations to network with or black and minority owned businesses.

      The question you pose is interesting, I wonder why it is not discussed more.

        • byJames
        • onJune 6, 2016

        Listen to yourself when you state 95% of your customer are White then you stated you will never understand Black people and you will not try. maybe the reason all your customers are White is because this is who you focus on only. I have experience that Black people in Business do not show the Black race the same respect as they show other race. and our money is green also.I have been in Business for 9 years and I have learn in order to be successful in Business you need Business from all Nationality and treat people the way you want to be treated. if don’t you will Handicap your Business and you will be out of Business very quickly with no one to blame but yourself.

      • bypat.
      • onMarch 24, 2017

      Tony. Would love yo visit your shop for some tasty pizza! About leaders speaking out. Look in the mirror you are that leader.

Leave a Reply

 
%d bloggers like this: